Last year over 100,000 students from four different continents participated in our third annual Global Day of Design.

The hashtag went viral as students and teachers shared and launched their creative projects all day long around the globe. This year, we are doing it again, and we can’t wait to see what students design, build, and make!

This year feels a little different because of Covid-19 and social isolation. However, as teachers, we can have students engage in design thinking at home using whatever materials they have!

The 2020 Global Day of Design will be held on May 6th!

Go to the GlobalDayOfDesign.com and get access to 20+ FREE design challenges that you can use or tweak/modify. Enter your details into the form at the bottom of this post and receive a Design Challenge for FREE.

You can also fill out this Google Form to include your class/school and students in the official count for The Global Day of Design.

Students will be able to use the design challenges and maker projects on GlobalDayOfDesign.com to create all kinds of things. Some of the design challenges include:

I also created a specific design challenge related to this period of quarantine:

How Do I Share What My Students Are Doing on the Global Day of Design?

This year the Global Day of Design will take place on 5/6/2020. We will be sharing students designing, building, making, and tinkering on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram using the hashtag #GDD20!

Use the Hashtag #GDD20 on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Just be sure that you have the proper permission from students and that their parents or guardians have filled out media release forms before you share anything on social media.

What is Design Thinking?

Maybe you’ve heard the term before or even read some articles on Design Thinking. Here’s GDD co-founder John Spencer’s description of Design Thinking from a K-12 viewpoint:

The term “design thinking” is often attached to maker spaces and STEM labs. However, design thinking is bigger than STEM. It begins with the premise of tapping into student curiosity and allowing them to create, test and re-create until they eventually ship what they made to a real audience (sometimes global but often local). Design thinking isn’t a subject or a topic or a class. It’s more of way of solving problems that encourages risk-taking and creativity.

Here is The LAUNCH Cycle video we created to explain Design Thinking to K-12 Students (watch it, you’ll love it!):

Launch Into Design Thinking

Want to get started with design thinking? Check out this page with free articles, videos, and resources. Also, check out the toolkit below.

Get the FREE Design Thinking Toolkit

Launch box

Get this free toolkit along with members-only access to my latest blog posts and resource

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit
John Spencer

John Spencer

My goal is simple. I want to make something each day. Sometimes I make things. Sometimes I make a difference. On a good day, I get to do both.More about me

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.