Getting Started with Student Choice

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For all the talk of student engagement, I wonder if we’re asking the wrong question. Instead of asking, “How do I engage my students?” a better question might be, “How do I empower them?” The answer is empowerment. This is what happens when students own the entire learning process. It’s what happens when they ask the questions and choose the strategies. It’s what happens when they are empowered to think critically and create. In this series, we dive into the question of student choice. A great starting point might be the free eBook Getting Started with Student Choice. You can get it by scrolling down to the bottom of the page. Please note that this series is a work in progress. I’ll be adding to this series throughout the year.

Part One: Why Student Choice Matters

 

Part Two: A Bigger Definition of Student Choice

 

Part Three: Getting Started with Student Choice

 

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John Spencer

My goal is simple. I want to make something each day. Sometimes I make things. Sometimes I make a difference. On a good day, I get to do both.

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4 responses

  1. […] can learn effectively, regardless of differences in ability.” John Spencer asks himself: What happens when students have choice in the way they learn and show evidence of their […]

  2. […] can learn effectively, regardless of differences in ability.” John Spencer asks himself: What happens when students have choice in the way they learn and show evidence of their […]

  3. […] can learn effectively, regardless of differences in ability.” John Spencer asks himself: What happens when students have choice in the way they learn and show evidence of their […]

  4. […] efectivamente, sin importar las diferencias de habilidad.” John Spencer se pregunta: ¿Qué pasa cuando los alumnos tienen opciones para la forma de aprender y mostrar evidencia de su […]

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